Thursday, February 12, 2015

Rainy Rambles




It's been one wet, wet week. We received over 150mls of rain in one night, and it hasn't really dried out since then. The days have gotten finer, but everyday since last Friday has still been dampened by drifts of drizzle and rain that blows in from the mountains. Despite the sogginess, the piled up laundry, squelchy mud, slippery paddocks and grey skies, I am not complaining.
 As I wrote in my last post, I thrive on rainy weather.

will admit that I also enjoy my fair share of sunshine, and after it's been grey and bleak for several weeks you may hear me grumbling. Some might even describe it as moaning. But alas, that is human nature and the way everyone tends to roll. And even when I do moan or grumble, know that I am still grateful for every drop we receive.
To think that only a matter of weeks ago our region was dry and dusty, and what few patches of green were around were only short and certainly not lush.
The lush green of February has arrived. Gumboots, umbrellas and raincoats are in use around here.



With all this wet weather comes new light to photograph in and new subjects to photograph. Over night, an entire village of toadstools appeared in the sheep's paddock. I say village because I do still like to think of toadstools as homes for certain make-believe creatures. There is just something so marvellously enchanting about these little fungi, how can I not let my imagination play with them a little? They were great fun to photograph too. I shan't make you think I'm some kind of toadstool nerd by telling you just how many photos I took of each subject; I've just shared my favourite two shots above.


It's actually sunny today.
I am enjoying the sunshine while it lasts, we're apparently in for more heavy rain this weekend. Although when the weather bureau announces that, it's understandable, if you don't believe them.
The animals are also enjoying the sunshine; no doubt they're happy to have their hooves and feet on drier ground.
The sheep are extra happy; they've been moved to greener, lusher and higher-grounded pastures. They're back employed as the brush-cutters of the native tree strip. Handy little animals they've turned out to be. I love the expression on Daisy's face in the photo above.
So it's ok if you think my love of photographing toadstools is peculiar,
 I'm pretty sure she did too.


......................................

I hope you've had a satisfying week so far, and I hope you have a lovely weekend.


Sarah x

16 comments

  1. Oh wow, the rain sure did make everything lush. I don't think your love of photographing toadstools is peculiar. They are very appeasing. Your pictures turned out great! And Daisy's expression is so cute. Have a great weekend, even though you may have rain. We are in for some very cold temps in our area.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank-you Laurie, I hope you stay warm this weekend! :-)

      Delete
  2. Great photos Sarah...lovely sheep. It looks very damp! x

    ReplyDelete
  3. Tha rain made everything so gorgeous!
    Your pics are everyday more beautifull.
    In love with those sheep

    ReplyDelete
  4. That's a lot rain! We don't have a rainy season here, it's interspersed nicely with the sunny days of summer. Seeing things come up green and mushroomy overnight must be a wonderful sight! When we have a lot of rain, the woods here teem with beautiful fungi. I noticed once there was a "fungi walk" at one of the campgrounds we were at. They were so interesting and colourful (reds, blues, yellows). Love the photo of your sheep with their ragged coats. I'll bet their enthusiasm for the rain isn't quite on the same level as yours ;) Enjoy your week/end! Wendy

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That sounds wonderful Wendy! No the sheep aren't too impressed with the rain, they're grateful for their shed, and when it's been heavy rain all day they've spent most of their day in there with a bucket of nice dry hay :-)

      Delete
  5. Love the pics:) Why do the sheep still have only part of their coats on? (obviously I don't know alot about sheep, cattle country here)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you Erin!
      They're Dorpers so they're self-shedding, we don't have to shear them. They rub their wool off themselves, they're half way through shedding at the moment so are looking quite raggy. By the end of summer they should be almost or completely "clean" and only have their short hair left, then the wool will grow back in winter :-)

      Delete
    2. Thanks for explaining. So do you have to go around the paddock 'collecting' the wool?

      Delete
    3. You're welcome :-)
      No they only lose it in little shreds and amounts; any I have seen in the paddock or stuck on the fence disappears really fast, I think birds must take it for nests, or so I've heard anyway. A wool lined nest would be so comfy and plush!

      Delete
  6. Your shots are stunning Sarah! Im glad you are taking in the weather and finding the beauty in it all! Those toadstools you captured are gorgeous! Happy weekend you! Nicole xoxo

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you so much for your lovely comment Nicole x

      Delete
  7. Gorgeous images as always Sarah. And your sheep really do look like such lovely girls ... masses of character shines through.

    ReplyDelete

Hello! Please don't be shy - leave a comment, answer a question or tell your own story! I love the conversation and community - it's what blogging is all about x

You don't need an account to comment, simply use the Anonymous option or Name/URL

© Say Little Hen
Maira Gall